more-people-vaccinated-against-covid-19-in-wisconsin-than-have-been-infected,-state-health-data-shows

Good news has been hard to come by in the year that’s been the coronavirus pandemic, but with the recent approval of a third COVID-19 vaccine and an accelerated vaccination effort across the country overall, some states appear to be turning a corner. Take Wisconsin, for example, where more people have now been vaccinated against the novel disease than infected by it, state health data shows. 

As of Thursday, Wisconsin has recorded some 568,352 cases of COVID-19. But estimates from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services on Thursday also show that nearly 650,000 people in the Badger State have received both doses of the vaccine, while more than 1 million had received at least one dose. 

For context, Wisconsin’s total population is around 5.8 million. 

The majority of vaccines have been administered to residents 65 years of age and older, according to state health data. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services in a tweet noted that 1 in 3 Wisconsinites 65 and older have been vaccinated. 

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The news comes after President Biden announced in a primetime address on Thursday even that he is directing all states to ensure all adult Americans are eligible for vaccination by May 1. The new directive comes as part of a broader strategy that included increasing the number of vaccine sites and active-duty troops supporting the vaccination effort.

So far, states have limited eligibility, prioritizing high-risk individuals and front-line workers, although more states have recently expanded the field of who can obtain one. 

BIDEN DIRECTS STATES TO MAKE ALL ADULTS ELIGIBLE FOR COVID-19 VACCINES BY MAY 1

Biden during his speech also set a goal for Americans to begin holding gatherings by July 4.

“Photos and videos from 2019 feel like they were taken in another era, the last vacation, the last birthday with friends, the last holiday with extended family,” Biden said.

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“While it was different for everyone, we all lost something, a collective suffering, a collective sacrifice —  a year filled with the loss of life and the loss of living for all of us, but in the loss, we saw how much there was to gain,” he continued. “Finding light in the darkness is a very American thing to do. In fact, it may be the most American thing we do.”

Fox News’ Sam Dorman contributed to this report. 

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